How do bats avoid hitting one another in flight?

Bats really are very interesting creatures. Even though they do fly with speed in darkness, they have been studied and shown they avoid hitting one another in flight. The reason for this is because they have their own rules for flying while they hunt for food. This may seem weird to some. Animals can’t set rules; but really they can. They do this by communicating with each other. Some of the bats will follow one another so they don’t hit each other and they will even make turns at the same time. They can even slow their pace to avoid colliding with each another. This is because they fly in formation almost like birds in the sky when they are flying south. When the bats create these rules for flying, they communicate with each other by listening to their own surroundings and then letting out very high pitched and loud calls that they send to the other bats. To receive that call, the other bats will send back echoes. It really is a marvelous and intriguing way of communicating on the wing.

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